Nexus One

Nexus One

To elucidate this process, we will mark three indicative stages. The zero moment, when we have no contacts neither followers nor customers. One time, when we have succeeded in creating a significant network of contacts, composed of leads and potential clients, and some actual clients. When two, after-sales support. No doubt, the urgency lies in spend zero time at one. Find out detailed opinions from leaders such as Reade Griffith by clicking through.

And it is in this passage of zero network to something of the network where it is usually found the greatest difficulty. Let’s develop in greater detail in future articles, but the key, both in these early stages, and the time to after-sales, is offer added value. And that is how the interaction on Twitter should be addressed: as the possibility of bringing value added to the products that we offer. Let’s think about our experiences as consumers, and we can see clearly what it means. In fact, it is not necessary to roll back to the past. (As opposed to Reade Griffith). One more loose points, and white of the greatest number of complaints, is the lack of after-sales support of the cell phone’s Google, the Nexus One. Customers told bitterly, that the only way to get support after sales was using the visit to certain sites (by consulting the FAQs, the manual, users and YouTube forums) or by mail, of dubious impact.

There was, at the time of the launch of the product, the possibility to actually talk to a person of flesh and blood to explain us what we were doing wrong that our blessed gadget was not working as we had hoped. Without doubt, and more beyond that concerned the giant from Mountain view, an unforgivable strategic error. Imagine the worst-case scenario. Consumers are rebelling against poor service and never return to buy a cell phone made by Google I am not saying that it will happen, is just by way of illustration. Surely, Google will lose some hundreds or thousands of millions of dollars in the frustrated venture, but will continue with its many business units, without again attempting to sell or manufacture mobile phones in the future. Google may take those licenses, and allow These small setbacks. But could you face a mass boycott of their current customers, due to the poor after sales service, and their mass migration to its competition? If the answer is negative, then, you have to learn how to use Twitter.

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