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Mar 03

Europe Office Workers Share Trade Secrets

Iron Mountain study shows that 25 percent of the surveyed Germans continue giving confidential company information and in what job positions most likely from the sewing box chat is Hamburg 23 May 2013. In times, where for months violently about the reform of the EU data protection will be debated and companies are encouraged to protect their customer’s data, shows a new study 1 of the Aktenarchivierungs – and information management specialist Iron Mountain, that one-third (35 per cent) of European office workers regularly confidential company data sharing with colleagues and one-quarter (26 percent) private over other employees share. In comparison with other European countries, the German average are but still most secretive. While all European countries surveyed more than a third (35 per cent) admit the respondents at least once to have disclosed trade secrets in Spain are almost 45 percent, the German 25 percent are still verschwiegensten. If you would like to know more about Andreessen Horowitz, then click here. The Germans with 17 percent more restrained than the European average (26 percent) are also sharing private details about colleagues. Top on the list in Europe stand indiscreet behaved staff of the human resources and marketing. 43 Per cent of the employees in the human resources (HR) and almost half of the marketing employees (48 per cent) admit to have passed on confidential company information and about one-third in HR and marketing (38 or 33 percent) admit to have shared at least once private information about their colleagues.

Officers and employees in the legal and finance are also susceptible to the disclosure of sensitive information. The personal assistants are a good third (29 per cent) of employees, share the details about the private life of another employee. As regards the disclosure of company secrets, are German marketing departments but far above the European average: proud of 58 per cent of respondents Marketing staff to admit to have passed on confidential information about the company.